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Today's Weather: Cornell Forecast

EAS hosts frontier research on a wide variety of processes which drive the solid earth, the oceans, and the atmosphere.  We are dedicated to training the next generation of global leaders in earth and atmospheric sciences while promoting a citizenry informed on the science behind the important environmental and hazard issues of our time.

Recent News

Future of right whales depends on adaptive conservation policies

Humanity may forfeit the chance to save North Atlantic right whales from extinction if conservation...

Bloom book available at Cornell Store June 8

The late Prof. Emeritus Art Bloom's book, "Gorges History: Landscapes and Geology of the Finger...

Radiocarbon cycle studies may call for change of historical calibration

Tree-ring research of the southern Levant region by Sturt Manning, PI, and EAS alums Carol Griggs...

cover 2017

Did you know?

"What we perceive as colors in the sky is actually different wavelengths of visible light. Blue light has a shorter wavelength then red light. As visible light travels through the atmosphere, it is scattered by air molecules and tiny impurities (such as dust particles) that are suspended in the air. The blue wavelengths are scattered in all directions. This is why no matter in which direction you look the sky appears blue on a clear day. If enough of the blue light is scattered, little or no blue light remains in the sunbeam that reaches your eyes. The predominant visible wavelength that is left is red and the sky turns orange or red, particularly in the direction of the sun. The clouds also reflect and absorb the sunlight, reducing the total amount of light that reaches the Earth's surface. This makes the sky appear gray, or even black, if enough light is reflected and absorbed by the clouds."- Art DeGaetano, Ask a Scientist! Read More