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Two New EAS Faculty Searches in Progress

The Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) at Cornell is focused on understanding the nature and evolution of our home planet by applying the basic principles of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. EAS hosts frontier research on a wide variety of processes which drive the solid earth, the oceans, and the atmosphere. From geohazards to critical resources, from the origin of mountains to the origin of megastorms, from the inner core to the edge of space, from reading the geological record of ancient earth to forecasting meteorological threats to future earth, the scientists and students of EAS use the latest technologies while traveling the globe to probe our physical environment. We are dedicated to training the next generation of global leaders in earth and atmospheric sciences while promoting a citizenry informed on the science behind the important environmental and hazard issues of our time.

Today's Weather

Cornell Forecast

Student site for Cornell Meteorology

Recent News

Cornell Reports from COP23

EAS delegates and others from Cornell attend convention in Bonn, Germany.

Monger receives Weiss Provost's Teaching Fellowship

Awardees recognized for commitment to extraordinary teaching.

Did you know?

Sidney Kaufman (1930, AB; 1934, Ph.D.) collected the first off-shore seismic reflection profile and as chief of a water seismic crew that normally operated in bays, marshes, inlets and lagoons, Kaufman found a rock formation that extended from a bay near Corpus Christi into the Gulf. When his boss discovered what he was doing, he said "What the hell are you doing in 65 feet of water? You know we can't drill out there" and Kaufman returned to land. Decades later, the company put his findings to work in offshore production.His studies helped lead to petroleum production in the Gulf of Mexico. Kaufman later return to Cornell as a professor in geophysics.