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The Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University is a global leader in research directed toward understanding the fundamental processes that have shaped our planet, and is committed to providing Cornell students with the earth literacy needed to serve as informed citizens and wise stewards of the Earth. 

We offer undergraduate degree programs for students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering. The Atmospheric Science undergraduate major is available to students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, while the Science of Earth Systems undergraduate major is available to students in all three colleges. In addition, we offer undergraduate minors in Atmospheric Science, Climate Change, and Science of Earth Systems. Finally, we offer M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in the field of Atmospheric Science and M.Eng., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in the field of Geological Sciences.

Class Geol

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Did you know?

"What we perceive as colors in the sky is actually different wavelengths of visible light. Blue light has a shorter wavelength then red light. As visible light travels through the atmosphere, it is scattered by air molecules and tiny impurities (such as dust particles) that are suspended in the air. The blue wavelengths are scattered in all directions. This is why no matter in which direction you look the sky appears blue on a clear day. If enough of the blue light is scattered, little or no blue light remains in the sunbeam that reaches your eyes. The predominant visible wavelength that is left is red and the sky turns orange or red, particularly in the direction of the sun. The clouds also reflect and absorb the sunlight, reducing the total amount of light that reaches the Earth's surface. This makes the sky appear gray, or even black, if enough light is reflected and absorbed by the clouds."- Art DeGaetano, Ask a Scientist! Read More