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The Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) at Cornell is focused on understanding the nature and evolution of our home planet by applying the basic principles of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. EAS hosts frontier research on a wide variety of processes which drive the solid earth, the oceans, and the atmosphere. From geohazards to critical resources, from the origin of mountains to the origin of megastorms, from the inner core to the edge of space, from reading the geological record of ancient earth to forecasting meteorological threats to future earth, the scientists and students of EAS use the latest technologies while traveling the globe to probe our physical environment. We are dedicated to training the next generation of global leaders in earth and atmospheric sciences while promoting a citizenry informed on the science behind the important environmental and hazard issues of our time.

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Recent News

Hariharan '18 Becomes Rawlings Cornell Presidential Scholar

Anant Hariharan '18 has been accepted into the RCPS program. He is one of 25 rising junior; 200...

Pryor and Mahowald's Research Projects Included in ACSF's Selected 2016 Academic Venture Fund Awards.

Sustainability challenges addressed by 2016 AVF awards to benefit people, environment.

Three EAS Graduate Students Receive NASA Fellowships

Delgado, Durkin, Hadnott receive Earth and Space Science fellowships from NASA.

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Did you know?

"What we perceive as colors in the sky is actually different wavelengths of visible light. Blue light has a shorter wavelength then red light. As visible light travels through the atmosphere, it is scattered by air molecules and tiny impurities (such as dust particles) that are suspended in the air. The blue wavelengths are scattered in all directions. This is why no matter in which direction you look the sky appears blue on a clear day. If enough of the blue light is scattered, little or no blue light remains in the sunbeam that reaches your eyes. The predominant visible wavelength that is left is red and the sky turns orange or red, particularly in the direction of the sun. The clouds also reflect and absorb the sunlight, reducing the total amount of light that reaches the Earth's surface. This makes the sky appear gray, or even black, if enough light is reflected and absorbed by the clouds."- Art DeGaetano, Ask a Scientist! Read More